Sunday, June 24, 2007

 

Mariposa Grove of Giant Sequoias, Yosemite National Park [stereo pairs]


[NOTE: Red/cyan ANAGLYPH versions of these CROSS-VIEWING stereo pairs are featured in the very next post.]

View these CROSS-VIEWING stereo pairs in 3-D without glasses:

1) Click on images to enlarge
.

2) View the stereo pair straight on and from a distance of about 2-feet from your screen.

3) Cross or converge your eyes a bit until you see three virtual images. [NOTE: If you don't cross or converge your eyes enough, you will likely only see the two images as they appear on the page. If you cross or converge your eyes too much, you may see four images.]

4) With all three images in your line of sight, continue holding focus on all three and gaze upon the center of the three images. The virtual center image will appear fully three-dimensional.

If at first you don't succeed, be patient and try again. The dimensional rewards are well worth the effort.

[Stereo pair posted above]
Lupine bloom by pond, Fish Camp, south of Yosemite National Park, California.

© Abe Perlstein



Cabin and giant sequoias, Mariposa Grove, Yosemite National Park, California.
© Abe Perlstein






California Tunnel Tree, Mariposa Grove, Yosemite National Park, California. Cut in 1985 for stagecoaches. This is one of two trees tunneled in years past. The other tree, the aptly named Fallen Wawona Tunnel Tree apparently fell in a violent winter storm sometime in the late 1960's.
© Abe Perlstein







Fallen Monarch, Mariposa Grove, Yosemite National Park, California. The upended root ball, partially seen here was gigantic, about 25-feet across. One feels humbled when standing next to these behemoths.
© Abe Perlstein



The Grizzley Giant, Mariposa Grove, Yosemite National Park, California. This tree is one of the largest in the grove and, at 2,700 years, one of the oldest living Sequoias on the planet. The huge limb on the right side of the trunk is nearly seven feet in diameter! The base was at least 25-feet across. Even stereo photos do little to make one appreciate the sheer volume of this ancient giant.
Look carefully (after clicking and enlarging the pair) and see the figure in a red shirt at the bottom for a sense of scale.
© Abe Perlstein



Mariposa Grove Museum, Yosemite National Park, California. Built in 1930 and restored in 1983, this cabin occupies the site where Galen Clark built a small cabin in 1861. The siting of this rustic cabin surrounded on all sides by towering and a few downed giant sequoias is possibly the most arresting image one can experience in the grove.
© Abe Perlstein



Mariposa Grove Museum, Yosemite National Park, California. A somewhat different angle on the cabin than in the preceding view. Why black & white versus color? I made the B&W conversion as the early morning shaded colors in the original were on the bland side.

© Abe Perlstein




Trail and fencing leading to Mariposa Grove Museum, Yosemite National Park, California.

© Abe Perlstein





Ponderosa Pines, Mariposa Grove, Yosemite National Park, California. While these trees are smaller than their giant sequoia neighbors, they are still might large. Look carefully and you will see a figure in a red shirt at the bottom of the center tree.

© Abe Perlstein





Pine cone and burned/hollowed out stump, Mariposa Grove, Yosemite National Park, California. The cone was about one-foot in length.

© Abe Perlstein











Mature fire-scorched Ponderosa Pines, Mariposa Grove, Yosemite National Park, California. A park ranger explained "prescribed burns" take place from time to time in various parts of the grove to reduce unburned fuel from the forest floor and to promote growth of new sequoia saplings, the seeds of which can only germinate after fire.
© Abe Perlstein




[Image below]
Trail Cut Through Downed Trees, Mariposa Grove, Yosemite National Park, California. The height of the log to the left was above six feet.

© Abe Perlstein




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